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WHO’s NCD Commission Lights a Fire Under Heads of State

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Global Health Now, reports that to date, no country has met the 19 requirements of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Sustainable Development Goal 3.4: to reduce by one-third, premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases by 2030, as pledged in 2011 and 2014. The report, “Time to Deliver” released by the WHO’s Independent High-Level Commission on Noncommunicable Diseases, addresses the concerns of fragile health systems in countries, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Currently, nearly 41 million people die annually from non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, lung, and heart disease. The commission members of the WHO recommend 6 solutions to the issue, the most critical one recommending the heads of state and government—not health ministers—should take charge of the NCD agenda because it crosses so many different government sectors. Read more…

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Partnering to Transform Global Cancer Care: a Reception

REGISTER

The International Cancer Expert Corps Board of Directors is hosting a series of receptions throughout the year to introduce the work of the organization to interested individuals. Our second reception will be held on October 5, 2016, in New York City and offers the opportunity to learn more about our efforts to improve global cancer care.

Partnering to Transform Global Cancer Care Reception     

The New York Athletic Club
180 Central Park South
New York, New York
October 5, 2016  6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Presentation: 7:00 PM – 7:30 PM

RSVP REQUIRED – CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Speakers include:
Norman Coleman, MD, DSc (h.c.) FASTRO
Senior Scientific Advisor to ICEC

Nelson Chao, MD
Donald D. and Elizabeth G. Cooke Professor
Chief, Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy/BMT
Director, Global Cancer, Duke University

John “Mac” Longo, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin, Radiation Oncology 
“Walking Forward” South Dakota, National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD)

Onyinye Balogun, MD
Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at
Weill Cornell Medical Center
Global Health Programs in Armenia and Gabon

Silvia C. Formenti, MD 
Chair of Radiation Oncology,
Weill Cornell Medical College
Radiation Oncologist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center

Guests must RSVP for security purposes. RSVP by clicking this link, or send an email to development@iceccancer.org or call 301-461-3420.

The ICEC is offering the opportunity for individuals, corporations, professional societies and organizations to underwrite the costs of these receptions and to support our ongoing efforts. If interested, please complete the mail-in donation form or donate online below. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our development team at development@iceccancer.org, or our Chief Operations Officer Nina Wendling via email at nina.wendling@iceccancer.org or by phone at 301-461-3420.

ICEC Board of Directors From left to right: Norm Coleman, Harmar Brereton, Monique Mansoura, David Kramer, Donna O'Brien, David Pistenmaa, Larry Roth, Nina Wendling, Richard Slowinski (Baker & McKenzie) and Barry Alperin. Missing: Bhadrasain Vikram, Nelson Chao, Daniel Petereit, Tim Williams and Sylvia Formenti

ICEC Board of Directors From left to right: Norm Coleman, Harmar Brereton, Monique Mansoura, David Kramer, Donna O’Brien, David Pistenmaa, Larry Roth, Nina Wendling, Richard Slowinski (Baker & McKenzie) and Barry Alperin. Missing: Bhadrasain Vikram, Nelson Chao, Daniel Petereit, Tim Williams and Sylvia Formenti

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Workshop Report for Cancer Research: Defining the Shades of Gy: Utilizing the Biological Consequences of Radiotherapy in the Development of New Treatment Approaches—Meeting Viewpoint

The ability to physically target radiotherapy using image guidance is continually improving with photons and particle therapy that include protons and heaver ions such as carbon. The unit of dose deposited is gray (Gy);however, particle therapies produce different patterns of ionizations, there is evidence that the biological effects of radiation depend on dose size, schedule, and type of radiation. This National Cancer Institute (NCI) Sponsored workshop addressed the potential of using radiation-included biological perturbations in addition to physical dose, Gy, as a transformation approach to quantifying radiation. Read the article…

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Partnering to Transform Global Cancer Care Reception

ICEC Board of Directors 2016

ICEC Board of Directors From left to right: Norm Coleman, Harmar Brereton, Monique Mansoura, David Kramer, Donna O’Brien, David Pistenmaa, Larry Roth, Nina Wendling, Richard Slowinski (Baker & McKenzie) and Barry Alperin. Missing: Bhadrasain Vikram, Nelson Chao, Daniel Petereit, Tim Williams and Sylvia Formenti

 

On June 1, 2016, the International Cancer Expert Corps Board of Directors hosted the first in a series of receptions, “Partnering to Transform Global Cancer Care” at the law offices of Baker & McKenzie, LLP in Washington, DC. The purpose of the event series is to introduce the efforts of the organization to friends and colleagues in the corporate, scientific, governmental and philanthropic communities.  The venue, perched just above Lafayette Park overlooking the White House, the Washington Monument, and the Jefferson Memorial, served as an idyllic setting for the ICEC’s first of several introductory gatherings.

This well-attended event, made possible through the generous support of Baker &McKenzie, LLP and the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Ontario, attracted a broad range of individuals. Attendees included representatives from the Alberta First Nations Information Governance Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital- Taiwan (CGMH), Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH), National Nuclear Security Administration, National Cancer Institute (NCI) and many others. Many of the organizations represented at the reception are listed below. The evening was highlighted by a short program which included overviews of several programs focused on global health. Keith Martin, MD, the Executive Director of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) reflected on the importance of collaborations in efforts to make substantive improvements in global health initiatives. The CUGH is located in Washington, DC and is a stalwart supporter of the ICEC.

Daniel G. Petereit, MD, of the John Vucurevich Cancer Care Institute at the Rapid City Regional Hospital in South Dakota, shared his experiences as the Principal Investigator of the community-based participatory research program, “Walking Forward” in western South Dakota. The program is funded by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) and lauded as an exemplary program proving that high-quality mentoring networks do improve both access to, and the quality of care delivered to indigenous populations in underserved areas.

Lastly, Dr. Surbhi Grover, MD, MPH, one of ICEC’s Early Career Leaders and an Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the principle lead for the Botswana-UPENN partnership, highlighted many of the successes and challenges she has faced while developing an oncology program in Gaborone, Botswana. Though she has experienced many trials and tribulations, her efforts and the efforts of others have served as a catalyst to make a significant difference in the delivery of cancer care in Sub-Saharan Africa.

ICEC will host the next reception in October 2016 in New York City. Details will be posted on the ICEC website. To attend or to sponsor an upcoming event, or for more information on the 2016 ICEC Partnering to Transform Global Cancer Care reception schedule, please contact ICEC at development@iceccancer.org.

June 1, 2016, Reception – Organizations Represented
Alberta First Nations Information Governance Centre (AFNIGC)
American Cancer Society
American Indian “Walking Forward” Program
Anne Arundel Medical Center
Association of Independent Schools of Greater Washington
Baker & McKenzie, LLP
Bethesda Systems
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital- Taiwan (CGMH)
Consortium of Universities for Global Health
Dana-Farber Global Cancer Medicine
Dartmouth Medical School
Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration
Duke University
Hughes Network Systems
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Johns Hopkins SOM
Medical College of Wisconsin
Metro State University of Denver
National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute
National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship
National Cancer Institute, Radiation Research Program
Pulmonary Hypertension Association
SBK Partnership, LLC
Seqirus
Strategic Visions in Healthcare, LLC
The Commonwealth Medical School
University of Maryland Baltimore Campus
University of Pennsylvania
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The Radiation Stress Response: Of the People, By the People and For the People

Dr. Norm Coleman received a Failla Memorial Lecture Award in November 2017 for his outstanding radiation research. Dr. Coleman currently is a senior scientific advisor to ICEC.

The radiation stress response can have broad impact. In this Failla Award presentation it is discussed in three components using terms relevant to the current political season as to how the radiation stress response can be applied to the benefit for cancer care and as service to society. Of the people refers to the impact of radiation on cells, tissues and patients. The paradigm our laboratory uses is radiation as a drug, called “focused biology”, and physics as “nano-IMRT” because at the nanometer level physics and biology merge. By the people refers to how the general population often reacts to the word “radiation” and how the Radiation Research Society can better enable society to deal with the current realities of radiation in our lives. For the people refers to the potential for radiation oncology and radiation sciences to improve the lives of millions of people globally who are now beyond benefits of cancer treatment and research. Read the article…

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Zimbabwe moves to protect women from spiraling cervical cancer rates

The Guardian reports,  “More than 260,000 women worldwide die annually of cervical cancer, which could soon overtake childbirth as the developing world’s biggest killer of women. Low- and middle-income countries account for 85% of all deaths, and Zimbabwe is among the five nations – all of them in sub-Saharan Africa – with the highest incidence of cervical cancer.”  Zimbabwe is addressing this looming crisis in conjunction with the Unicef, the World Health Organization and the Zimbabwean health ministry through a vigorous initiative to vaccinate young girls against the human papillomavirus expected to reach almost every corner of the country. Read more…

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National Institute on Minority Healthy and Health Disparities

National Institute on Minority Healthy and Health Disparities is providing a research opportunity for post-doctoral fellows, assistant professors, or individuals in similar early stage research career positions. The organization will host the Health Disparities Research Institute from June 23-27, 2018. The program will aim to assist the support the research career development of promising minority health and healthy disparities. It will also provide lectures, mock grant review, seminars, small group discussion on research relevant to minority health and health disparities with NIH scientific staff.

The due date for submitting an application is April 27th, 2018 (5 PM EST). Read the article…